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Biomass/Biopower

Many types of biopower systems are currently in use. They all produce energy from biological sources, such as wood chips and crop wastes, which are called biomass. These systems include direct combustion, cofiring, gasification, landfill biogas, anaerobic digestion, and biofuel (biodiesel and ethanol) production.

Direct combustion is the burning of biomass to produce steam and/or electricity.

Cofiring is the mixing of biomass with coal. Cofiring systems can burn up to 15 percent biomass when mixed with coal. Cofiring biomass with coal reduces emissions and produces fewer of the chemicals that cause acid rain.

Gasification involves producing gas from biomass sources such as wood chips or crop wastes. The gas can then be burned to produce electric and/or heat energy. This process can be more efficient than direct combustion and produces less pollution.

Another method for making biogas is to let landfills do the work. As paper and other biomass decay inside a landfill, they naturally produce methane. A related process is employed by anaerobic digestion systems where bacteria is used to break down manure and other waste products from livestock into methane.

Biofuels, including biodiesel and ethanol, are liquid fuels that can power cars and other vehicles. Biodiesel is produced from vegetable and animal fats, while ethanol is produced by fermenting crops or cellulose. Biofuels are popular with farmers as an extra source of income and with governments and communities as an alternative fuel for cars.

All biomass systems can be configured for combined heat and power (CHP) where by they produce both electricity and steam. This is an efficient and economically attractive option in many cases.

Our Solutions are focused on modular systems sized at 5 megawatts (MW) or less. These modular biopower systems can use direct combustion, cofiring, or gasification for power generation. They are well suited for generating biopower from locally grown resources or biomass waste for small towns, rural industries, farms, and ranches.

Learn more about systems using this technology, contact us.




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